prtothetrade

Archive for the ‘Art business’ Category

Launch of AsiaWeekNYC.com is Third Website for Cultural Travelers

In antiques online, Art and the American Way, Art business, Chinese art on February 25, 2012 at 5:23 pm

I am happy to announce that we have  launched  AsiaWeekNYC.com, the third destination website from Antiques Weeks Media, LLC. AsiaWeekNYC.com will have special appeal for Chinese buyers and cultural travelers in New York, March 16 – 24, for the Asia Week auctions and exhibitions.

Billed as the “Gateway to New York’s Asia Week,”  the website provided details on the

  • Asian art auctions at Bonham’s, Christies, Doyle NY, Gianguan Auctions, I. M. Chait and Sotheby’s
  • Arts of Pacific Asia Show (60 dealers)  Stella’s Pier Antiques Shows (14  Asian art dealers), Japanese Art Dealers Association Show (five dealers), Asia Week New York’s 33 multi-venue exhibitions
  •  Asia-themed attractions such as the New York Scholars Garden on Staten Island
  • places to stay
  •  travel tips
  • Asian art news

A supporting mobile app gives visitors immediate access to events and participants.

Asia Week was branded in the 1990’s by the large international auction houses as a means of attracting a universe of buyers to its Asian art auctions.  Primarily  known for its commercial aspects,  Asia Week also has a strong educational component.  Cultural societies, including Asia Society, Japan Society and Tibet House, to name a few,  as well as  museums as focused as the Museum of Chinese in America and as well known at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, open their spring exhibits in time for the Asia Week travelers.

Additionally, a slate of lectures and seminars conducted by authorities on many aspects of Asian art is directed at collectors and museum curators. All are open to the public.  The dates and times are posted on AsiaWeekNYC.com, along with contact information for tickets.

AsiaWeekNYC.com also introduces art lovers with a passing interest in Chinese antiques and Asian works of art to regional resources. For instance, the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City is represented, as is the Walters Collection in Atlanta, GA.  Short postings of content further this introduction.

From a purely practical point of view, AsiaWeekNYC.com makes it easy for travelers to get access to the auction schedules and find the more than ninety galleries opening their doors during Asia Week.  It also provides information on Asian-themed attractions in a fast, one-stop format.

As is the policy of Antiques Weeks Media, LLC when launching new sites, a donation in kind has been given to a worthy organization. The recipient of the AsiaWeekNYC.com donation is the New York Scholar’s Garden at the Staten Island Botanical Garden.

Supporting advertisers of AsiaWeekNYC.com include the Arts of Pacific Asia Show,  Gianguan Auctions, NYC, Stella Show Mgmt. Co., and New Focus On.com, the online magazine.

AsiaWeekNYC.com invites exploration by art collectors and cultural travelers. For more information, please visit http://www.AsiaWeekNYC.com.

About Antiques Weeks Media
Antiques Week Media, LLC is the publisher of category-specific destination web sites for America’s popular antiques weeks. Sites include AmericanaWeek.com, NashvilleAntiquesWeek.com, AsiaWeekNYC.com and PhiladelphiaAntiquesWeek.com.

Clocking Success

In antiques online, Art and the American Way, Art business, business on February 13, 2012 at 9:07 pm

It has been a while since I checked into this blog, although I’ve been posting regularly on AmericanaWeek.com … NashvilleAntiquesWeek.com and AsiaWeekNYC.com – our new destination websites.

Antiques Weeks Media, LLC, is the steward of destination websites for the named antiques week.  The sites are gateways the myriad shows, auctions, events that revolved around themed weeks.

Happy to report that AmericanaWeek.com was a huge success, given its launch was only three months prior to Americana Week.  We had good traffic, and gates at shows were up. Notably, the Shows that advertised on the destination site reported increases.

NashvilleAntiquesWeek.com, which reflected a smaller venue, held strong in its traffic too. Our co-founder was able to make the trip to Nashville and brought back some super info. The shows in Nashville feature more rustic American items. If you’d like an update, check out NashvilleAntiquesWeek.com

Now, we are populating the AsiaWeekNYC.com site. This is an International week, with a huge affluent audience. The acutions are competitive and scheduled to keep bidders hopping into cabs and chasing across town in time to watch their items of interest go off – and hopefully, into their possession.

AsiaWeekNYC.com has given a donation-in-kind to the Chinese Scholars Garden at Snug Harbor in Staten Island. This beautiful site is one of New York’s best kept secrets. It is home to an authentic classical Chinese garde, the first in the U.S. It’s situated on 80 acres of gardens, lawns and ponds.

As we grow the destination websites, I’ll be posting info here. Come back for a visit – or visit one of the sites themselves.

New Campaigns to Change Antiques Weeks

In antiques online, Art and the American Way, Art business, Twitter, Young Collectors on September 26, 2011 at 3:41 pm

Americana Week.com

I’m pleased to announce that we’re partnering with Eric Miller of Urban Art & Antiques to increase audiences for named antiques week shows across the country. The initiative is based on content, distribution and gratification.

We begin with New York’s  Americana Week.com, which comes up in January and kicks off a year’s worth of shows and commercial exhibitions. From Americana Week.com, we are branding the other weeks that so far have been comprised of multiple campaigns, each geared toward one established audience.

By trending towards a larger picture of the weeks and providing the first overview of them, ever, we will be serving the trade no one has attempted before.

We’ll be reaching out through informative content, much of it provided by the dealers and experts who join the campaign.

The website is destination oriented, even offering tips on places to stay.

We’ll be reaching out via social media, with targeted messages.

And, come Americana Week itself, a mobile app will let people on the go know where to go.

AmericanaWeek.com Travel Tips

You’ll find more about Americana Week at Americana Week.com

The second round of the program is already in place as we begin to negotiate Nashville Antiques Week and you’ll find that information at Nashville Antiques Week.com

Be sure to keep up the show weeks at Twitter: @americanaweek and @nashivlleantiquesweek.

@americanaweek

Like us on Facebook at Americana Week and Nashville Antiques Week.

To get involved as a sponsor, partner or advertiser, drop me a line at regina@americanaweek.com or eric@americanaweek.com

Both Eric and I are looking forward to making these weeks stronger than ever before.

Create Success by Association Now

In antiques online, Art and the American Way, Art business, business, Chinese art, Media Planning, selliing antques, Young Collectors on August 22, 2011 at 1:47 pm

I read in the NY Times that $1 stores are the new haunt of the middle class. It’s  instant gratification  2011 style. But that’s not good news for antique dealers and auctioneers who want to encourage shoppers to spend.  There is a way out though.

It is called “aspirational marketing.”

You see it all the time on HGTV, where realtors and decorators have created formats that make people want to buy a home, and redecorate the one they have.

You see on American Pickers, where Mike Wolfe makes junk look good. And if you think he’s not following  up those marginal picks with merch – check out his website’s line of accessories. The  guy is making people aspire to be him!

And later this week, the Keno brothers will launch Buried Treasure and people will get turned on to their brand of knowledge.

What these shows have in common is that they  educate  consumers.

They also have a distribution format – national TV – that gets the word out to millions.

And what happens then? The educated in the distribution pipeline are not content with what they learn – they want to own something that reflects their new-found knowledge.

Or, success by association with a product.  Your product, be it antique chair, Chinese jade, contemporary art.

Aspirational marketing. It doesn’t preach to the choir or attempt to mine an already established audience. It reaches new audiences and turns those new audiences into buyers.

Why? Because human nature being what it is, people want to be close to the things they like. And if they impress a friend or  boss in the process-so much the better.

So, think about aspirational marketing and how it can boost your sales.

And if you need expert guidance, you know where to come. PRT3 has several aspirational campaigns going now. There is room for another.

New York’s New Auction Houses

In Art business, Auction Advertising, Auctions, business, Chinese art, Cool Exhibitions, Young Collectors on August 15, 2011 at 2:28 pm

The last ten months have seen four neighborhood auctioneers spring up in Manhattan, or just across the 59th Street bridge, in Long Island City. At this rate, NYC will soon become the wholesale auction capital of the United States

Roland Auctions in Greenwich Village

Refreshingly, most are generalists. (Of the two that specialize, Hong Kong Auctions – which has been around for about 5 years – handles only Chinese, particularly paintings.  Gene Shapiro Auctions on the Upper East Side specializes in Russian art, with  successes in American and Continental art.)

Among the wholesale houses, the properties come from estates on Park Avenue, Fifth Avenue and the nearby tri-state area. They run to the types of items rich people collected in the 60s, 70s and 80s. For instance, mid-century modern designer furniture by Hans Wegner, Finn Juhl, Tomi Parzinger and others is being spit out by the truck load. Modern paintings too.

The condition is often excellent and while the provenance must often be discretely handled, almost all the auction houses state the addresses property was taken from.

Because most of these guys run monthly sales, you can’t buy glossy  image laden catalogs, so it is imperative to visit their websites often.  The sites tend towards bare bones, linking to catalogs posted on Live Auctioneers.com. The best way to see what they are selling is to visit the previews.

  • Hutter Auctions is on the West Side in midtown, not far from the Alvin Ailey School of Dance. It’s in a warehouse building, so you can’t peak in the windows. You must take the elevator and poke through a warren of holding rooms. Best buys tend to be traditional furniture, much of it by big name manufacturers.
  • Capo Auctions in Long Island City bills itself as a neighborhood auction houses. It draws from Long Island estates and recently featured weird items from the old Steinway Mansion. I can’t say what their best buys are but it’s easy enough to find out by checking the website and clicking  to prices realized.

Best advice – visit these venues and bid. As of this writing, you are competing mostly with dealers and that makes good odds that you will get what you want at a decent price. Another thing, often the items that don’t sell at auction get posted to 1st Dibs, where their  price increases.

Suze Orman, WWD, Antique Sellers

In antiques online, Art business, business, Drive Website Traffic, Media Planning, selliing antques on June 3, 2011 at 4:19 pm

Last night on PBS, Suze Orman gave the nation permission to NOT spend money. Her coinage is “Stand in your own truth.”

This morning, WWD (the fashion retailing bible) alerted readers that “Retailers Brace for Tougher Times.” Their resources said a spate of sales is forthcoming.

Retailers Face Tighter Times

Tor the clientele PRT3 serves, the real news is in the sub-text.   The competition is much broader  than you thought.  It includes  retailers who cultivate current customers and mine new audiences with  sales, promotions, discounts and special offers.

Your best defense is a good attack. Get your sales machine in gear now. When back-to-school cost increases  hit their peak, people will be less inclined to spend.

Your campaign for customers should begin today.

Longer days offer you longer selling hours.  Take the tombstone our of ads and promote a benefit. Or test the frequent shopper model. Go for collective buying power – test  a coupon on Groupon.

Collective Buying Power

In outreach efforts – social media, eblasts, Twitter, Facebook – optimize your communications with bona-fide reasons to spend.

Of course, there’s nothing better than building name recognition through a daily blog, press releases and articles.

Bottom line: borrow ideas liberally from the big boys,  the retailers who cannot afford to sit out a season.  As people start to take in Suze Orman’s “stand in your own truth” advice, they will base buying decisions on affordability and future gain.

Finally,  Ms. Orman says the foundation to healthy family economics is spending with cash.

Now that’s good news.

Discounts Rule on Facebook Fan Pages

In Art business, Auction Advertising, business, Drive Website Traffic, selliing antques on April 24, 2011 at 3:30 pm

When it comes to how art and antique dealers and other businesses see Facebook, there seems to be a major disconnect.  C-level officers and fans see things differently.

The IBM Institute for Business Value Analysis recently released results of a 2011 CRM Study, and the fallout leaves plenty of room on to make better use of your Facebook page.

To put a few of the more common perceptions in line, let’s start with the fact that more than 73% of business owners believe fans come to their Facebook page to learn more about new products. In contrast, only 51% of fans actually use Facebook fan pages for this reason.

71% of Facebook fan page owners load the page ups with general information because they believe that’s what fans want. Only 53% of fans log on for general info.

61% of site owners think fans come because they want to be part of a community.  Only 22% of fans want to be part of a corporate community.

How Business and Fans Disconnect on Facebook

The closest fan page owners and fans come to being in sync is when it comes to actual purchases. 60% of businesses believe fans like them because they want to buy something. 55% of fans come to purchase.

The main reason fans come to a business page is to for a discount. 61% of your fans come for the discount and 60% of fan page owners realize this.

The new results of the what may be the most comprehensive social media study to date is sure to make all of us re-think our use of Facebook fan pages.

That said, see you on Facebook. (BTW, we recently posted discounts.)

P.S. To enlarge the image above, click on it.

What Sellers Should Know About Facebook Now

In Art and the American Way, Art business, business, Drive Website Traffic on April 22, 2011 at 3:34 pm

As the rush to Facebook becomes more defined, the ways to use it are becoming more refined. That is, the metrics have been long enough to provide answers about how to best use Facebook, when to post and what your “likes” expect from your page. (I’ll address expectations in the next blog post.)

Here are the new ground rules for making the most of Facebook.

The best day to publish is not a weekday. It’s the weekend. Good information that is published on Saturday and Sunday pulls in the widest audience.

The best time to post is 8:00 a.m.  Like you, people are more receptive to information before they get caught up in the day’s activities.

The content that gets the most traffic is related to sex. Since you’re selling antiques, the best content is positivity. Coming in at third place is learning. And coming in at last place, work.

The most sharable word is Facebook. Since you’re probably not going on and on about FB, other words with a high share rate are: why, most and world. Video, health, how, big, bills, says all rank about the same in shareability.

The least shared words are vs, apple and review.  Down, poll, Twitter, game and york are next in line for least shared.

And, here’s a clincher, the best frequency of posts is every other day. (Whew! That gives us all more time to get some real work done.)

Since it’s  Friday , I’m going to hold my next post until Saturday morning at 8:00 and then I’ll share some positive information you can learn from  on Facebook.  And you can be sure to find out why, most things that happen in the world of antiques are big news.

Be sure to check PR To the Trade out at Facebook.

How to say “I love you” with PR

In Art and the American Way, Art business, Auction Advertising, business, Drive Website Traffic, selling antiques on April 19, 2011 at 11:06 pm

What do you want from your public relations platform?  Most of my clients start out saying they have everything in place except for the buzz.  And with today’s touch-and-go economy, most new clients want to know about the process of creating publicity.

Whether you’re going to use PR To the Trade or use your own time and talents to make an impact, here’s what you should strive for.

First, unify your Brand.

Rubick's Cube - Bringing all parts together

Unify your brand.

You may not have considered this, but everyone in your company needs to know exactly what your brand stands for.

If you’re an auction house, ask yourself: what sets us apart? If you’re a dealer, what makes your inventory different? If you’re an appraiser, what is the one quality you’d like most people to remember after they meet you?  Everyone in the company, from the President to the associates, needs to know the 10 words that define your company.

Next, simplify your message.

Streamline your message

Simplify


This can get tricky, especially if you’re hyped up over the coming auction of 300 lots or you have just unpacked a container. No matter how stoked you are, you must simplify. This often means using a different approach to the message.  Instead of listing all the inventory you want, talk about the overriding flavor of the offerings.

Third, amplify your message.

Amplify Your Message

Amplify Your Message


Know where you’re going to place your press releases. Do you have a list of journalists eager to hear from you because every press release you have ever sent them has been meaty? If not, this is the time to check your list and ask what the journalist or blogger is writing about next.

Now I won’t give you all our trade secrets, but there are platforms that give you access to tons of journalists and alert you to their most recent and coming projects.

Don’t forget the power of the Internet. Your message may not be timely for some, but it will always find audiences on the Internet, provided you have an enticing headline, a unified voice and a simplified message.

More trade secrets ebb out. Be sure to monitor the traction you’re getting on the Internet. Know how many impressions you are getting, how many full reads and where they’re coming from. And, definitely, make sure you know who is picking up your message.

Ultimately, the three most important words in your PR campaign are: unify, simplify, amplify.

Social Media and Good Writing

In Art business, Auction Advertising, Drive Website Traffic, Twitter on February 25, 2011 at 5:04 pm

 

Good Writing is No Secret

I went to two conferences last week – both on Social Media. Both with famous SEO guys who not only embrace SM (social media) but can talk for hours on it.  Interestingly, one of the key points to come of both sessions is good writing is more important than ever.

If you blog, you already know 250 – 300 words are best for a post.

Facebook gives you a bit more space to talk about the lion you met on the trek to Victoria Falls. Even so, you are still character limited.

Twitter – aha! – now you’re down to 14o characters. (I’ve had people tell me they can’t tweet because they can’t write short.)  Tweeting demands good writing skills.

Forget staring at a blank piece of paper, now you’re confined to space of a window. How can you quickly  master the techniques of good writing? Here are six simple steps.

  1. You can do it. Get the word “you” up front and you’re making instant contact. Nothing grabs a reader faster.  (“You’s” only serious competition is “free.” )
  2. Sell the benefits. If you say, “the desk has two  drawers over four,” that’s a feature. Say. “You get six drawers – two for your watches and socks, four for  your jeans and tee-shirts.” Even a minimalist will take note.
  3. Say why it’s smart to buy from you.  Tell you reader what sets off your shop. Is it free delivery? Trade-up guarantee? Or, it could be a matter of massaging your customer’s ego.
  4. Go conversational. Start your sentences with And or But. It is no longer against the law.

  1. Text msgs don’t translate.  Use “for,” not “4,” “you,” not “u.”
  2. Delete “that.” Getting rid of the “that” make your sentence flow more smoothly.
  3. Tell you reader what to do. The call to action – from “shop here” to “move your car” to visit PR To the Trade.com – works wonders.

Now, armed with these six simple steps, the task is not as daunting. Oh, one other word of wisdom from the pros…

  • You are your own best product. When using social media, please stop talking about yourself. SM is a  two-way conversation. Give your readers a break on the sales pitch and them get to know you.

So, follow me  on Twitter. Let’s get to know one another.